back to resources

Kitting Meaning: Product Kitting In Manufacturing

By
Joshua
on
Tuesday, October 27, 2020
Table of Contents

Do you find yourself holding onto a number of products that are similar, but you aren't selling as many as you like? Took advantage of too many bulk shipping rates and are sitting on lot of inventory? Before you try consignment to increase sales, try kitting.

Kitting is one of the most commonly used services in ecommerce fulfillment. Retailers, manufacturers, and online subscription services make use of kitting to increase their profits and minimize costs.

Here’s what kitting is and why so many businesses are using it.

Kitting Meaning

Kitting is a shipping and warehouse technique that has become popular with the rise in online stores. Product kitting is particularly popular with businesses like Amazon and large retail chains.

What Is Kitting?

Kitting is an inventory technique where individual, but related, products are packaged and shipped together as a single bundle. For example, one form of kitting that has taken off in recent years is the idea of subscription boxes. Rather than seven different manufacturers selling their products individually, subscription box services kit them into one package to sell. This increases the value and increases sales for the individual items.

Private Label Kitting

Private label kitting is when a group of products from different manufacturers are bundled, labeled, and shipped as one kit from another company. Private label products are very common in manufacturing and are made by one company to be sold under the name of another. This allows products to be sold at a much higher price as the labels add value to the market.

For example, the grocery stores are popular users of private label kitting. They often have “store brand” food including soda, soups, snacks, and more. However, they do not manufacture any of these products. They are created by a manufacturer, labelled with the store’s private label, then kitted and shipped to the stores in the chain.

The Kitting Process

The kitting process is very simple and requires assembling any number of products and assigning them a single SKU in your system for sale. This requires only a few steps.

  1. Determine what items will go into a kit. This can be done based on product use, theme, color, or any other shared quality you can think of.
  2. Assign this new bundle a unique SKU in your system. Though individual products, once bundled they represent a single sellable product. Your inventory system should track this so you have better insight into sales trends and a proper inventory count.
  3. Assemble the items. All items in the kit need to be relocated in your warehouse so that they can easily be bundled by your team. This increases efficiency and saves time and money. 
  4. Sell and ship the kits. Now you can easily market and sell these bundles. Then watch your revenue and profits increase.

Kitting in Manufacturing

Kitting in manufacturing involves organizing and assembling parts used in manufacturing products into bundles to deliver to the point of use. This allows a manufacturer to reduce their warehouse cost, streamline packing and shipping, and better track and control manufacturing inventory.

Kitting Warehouse

Utilizing kitting in a warehouse can be done alongside normal shipping operations and does not require any additional equipment or staff. However, it does require changing the way you pick product, use your staging area, and engage with workflows.

Kitting Meaning in Warehouse

Kitting in a warehouse is the physical act of finding multiple SKUs, bundling them into a single package, and creating a new SKU for that package before shipping.

Warehouse Kitting Procedure

Kitting product in a warehouse only takes a few steps to be done properly.

  1. Receive an order for multiple products. When a customer orders more than one item, they can all be put into a single package. This saves on shipping and ensures each item is picked.
  2. Collect each individual item. Since various items are combined into a single SKU, they need to be gathered together before beginning packing for an optimal workflow. These should all be assembled at a staging area.
  3. Package all items. Individual items should be scanned and then put into the same shipping box or as few boxes as possible.
  4. Create a new SKU and ship. This box is then added to your inventory system as a single SKU, scanned, and shipped.

Kitting and Packaging

When utilizing kitting, packaging is very important to highlight brand identity and ensure items are not damaged in transit and to help lower costs. Third-party shippers often offer to use private labelling on assembled kits. This means they gather the individual components of an order then package them with brand labels to make them all appear as though they are one kit. Properly packaged kits will hold as many items as possible while containing enough branded packaging to highlight the company they ordered from. These packages must also contain enough bubble wrap or other packaging materials to ensure no products are damaged in transit.

Kitting and Fulfillment

Kitting is used by most e-commerce fulfillment companies to lower warehouse and packing costs. This can be seen with companies like Amazon. When multiple orders are placed are often held until all items are gathered together and then a single package is shopped out. 

Here are a few ways kitting can improve fulfillment operations:

  • Reduces fulfillment fees. Picking and packing cost both a business and a customer. By kitting products, these actions require less effort and take less time, saving both groups money.
  • Expedites weighing and shipping. Speed is an important part of any fulfillment operation. Weighing and shipping individual products invariably takes more time than if the products are stored and sold together.
  • Saves on shipping costs. Though weight is a large part of shipping costs, fewer packages always saves money. Kits cost less to send and less cost is passed on to customers.

Kitting and Assembly

Kitting individual components for shipping is often used when shipping furniture, entertainment systems, and other items that require assembly after shipping. Many third-party shipping companies offer this service. They receive individual components from manufacturers and arrange them into kits for shipping to the final location. These kits are stored separately from the individual components before shipping.

Kitting Software

Kitting software is inventory management technology that can track individual components and create new SKUs for kits prior to shipping. There are many options on the market to help you automate and track your kitting processes.

Here are a few things to look for when purchasing kitting software:

  • Work in process inventory tracking. A good kit software will monitor the levels of  individual parts used in kit creation as well as the kits themselves. Many can apply ABC inventory analysis, too.
  • Kit forecasting. Kits need accurate life cycle inventory like any other inventory technique. The software should know the individual components used in kit creation and calculate the number of kits that can be made with the components on-hand.
  • Min/max tracking. The software should use sales levels to determine the maximum and minimum number of kits that should be in storage. This will let you maximize revenue and minimize cost as well as avoid issues like unintended backordering.

Why Use Inventory Kitting Software?

Investing in software can help you track components, kits, and determine the best course of action to increase sales and lower costs. Inventory kitting software can further streamline your warehouse workflows and give you insight into product data. It is often sold as an add-on to existing inventory software, so you may be able to upgrade the technology you already use.

That's The Whole Kit and Caboodle

Kitting is one of the best inventory management techniques to save companies time and money. While also giving customers the best bang for their buck. Merging separate items into one SKU allows retailers to increase sales of underperforming product. It also allows manufacturers to streamline their warehouse operations and lower costs.

If kitting isn't right for your business, you may want to look into dropshipping or just in time inventory. Both options help lower costs and make inventory processes more efficient.